DRAWING

Lilli, Anthony Ryder, Pencil on paper, 24x18, 2012 (Background from Haymaking, by Pieter Breugel)

At the Ryder Studio we understand that ours is just one among many ways of drawing. It is a focused study of shape, movement, form and light. The style is articulate and refined, incorporating a refined approach to line and shading.  

Figure Study, John Reger, Pencil on paper, 9x18, 2011

A BASIC FORMAT OF THE DRAWING PROCESS

I. We begin the basic drawing method with a large shape, which in the case of the full figure we call the ‘envelope’. 

II. From there we proceed to the ‘block-in’, which in its early stages is a rough approximation of the shape of the figure as we see it. 

III. Gradually we adjust and refine the block-in. 

IV. Meanwhile, so that our drawing will possess a feeling of living energy, we pay attention to the gestural action of the model. This we perceive in a system of internal movement curves. 

V. As the process of refinement continues, we replace the lines of the block-in with the contour, which is a more exact rendition of the outline of the model. The contour expresses the fluid continuity and fullness of the forms of the surface of the model. 

VI. Along with this, within the confines of the contour, we start to lightly map the shapes of shadows and other effects of light and shade. 

VII. Then we proceed to more and more definite shading, pushing the shadows darker and elaborating the subtle fabric of light and shade throughout the figure.  

Adam, Celeste Ryder, Pencil on paper, 18x16, 2012

Randall Orwig, John Reger, Graphite and white chalk pencils on tinted paper, 14x12, 2010 

Still-life

Vanitas, John Reger, Graphite and white chalk pencils on tinted paper, 14x14, 2013 

© Anthony Ryder 2014